Thyroid No Surgery 101: Thyroid Surgery Only After Second Opinion: 20% Swallowing Disorder Post Op Complication

Thyroid No Surgery 101: Thyroid Surgery Only After Second Opinion: 20% Swallowing Disorder Post Op Complication

Thyroid No Surgery 101: Thyroid Surgery Only After Second Opinion: 20% Swallowing Disorder Post Op Complication

No Surgery 101: Thyroid Surgery Only After Second Opinion: 20% Swallowing Disorder Post Op Lasts for months.

Dr.Guttler’s Comment

  1. Swallowing after thyroid surgery is studied in 220 patients.
  2. 20% were trouble free.
  3. 50% swallowing problems just right after the surgery.
  4. Sixteen patients (7.3%) stated that after a maximum of 3 months after surgery they suffered from dysphagia.
  5.  One (0.5%) patient stated that up to 3 months postoperatively, swallowing problems had been successfully treated by  logopedic therapy.
  6.   In 39 (17.6%) patients, the complaints persisted for more than 3 months or still existed at the time of the interview.
  7.  The more invasive the operation was, the more patients suffered from dysphagia.
  8. Significant risk of postoperative dysphagia in patients with Graves’ disease and carcinoma.
  9. This is just another reason to be sure the thyroid surgery is needed for your problem.
  10. Always get second opinions for any thyroid surgery.There is no thyroid surgery emergency.
  11. Thyroid surgery is elective and you have time to get opinions as to the need and extent of the surgery, and explore alternative less invasive alternatives like ethanol or radiofrequency ablation.
  12. Call for details for a pre-op evaluation before having surgery.
  13. 310-393-8860 or email thyroid.manager@protonmail.com
  14. Dr.G.

Postoperative swallowing disorder after thyroid and parathyroid resection

Hillenbrand A, et al

Pragmatic and Observational Research

 16 October 2018 Volume 2018:9 Pages 63—68

 

 

 

Introduction: Dysphagia is frequently reported after thyroidectomy. Here, we investigated the incidence of postoperative dysphagia after uncomplicated thyroidectomy and parathyroidectomy. Further, we analyzed diagnosis and types of therapy to identify possible patients at risk.
Patients and methods: A questionnaire was sent to 372 consecutive patients whose thyroid or parathyroid glands were operated on between May 2013 and October 2014 at Ulm University Hospital. Patients were questioned at least 6 months postoperatively.
Results: In the evaluation, 219 questionnaires could be included. Fifty-three (21.3%) patients reported that the overall postoperative swallowing process was better or more trouble-free. In 110 (50.2%) patients, dysphagia was reported only immediately postoperative and disappeared later spontaneously.Sixteen patients (7.3%) stated that after a maximum of 3 months after surgery they suffered from dysphagia. One (0.5%) patient stated that up to 3 months postoperatively, swallowing problems had been successfully treated by  logopedic therapy.  One (0.5%) patient stated that up to 3 months postoperatively, swallowing problems had been successfully treated by  logopedic therapy. In 39 (17.6%) patients, the complaints persisted for more than 3 months or still existed at the time of the interview We found no correlation between dysphagia and patients’ age or gender, the specimen volume, and patients’ body mass index. The more invasive the operation was, the more patients suffered from dysphagia. Analyzing the frequency of dysphagia according to different diagnoses, we found a significant risk of postoperative dysphagia in patients with Graves’ disease and carcinoma. Patients operated on for hyperparathyroidism were at significantly decreased risk of dysphagia.
Conclusion: Nearly 20% of patients reported postoperative dysphagia after uncomplicated thyroidectomy and parathyroidectomy, especially after major surgical intervention. We found a significant risk of postoperative dysphagia in patients with Graves’ disease and carcinoma and a decreased risk for patients operated on for hyperparathyroidism.

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