Thyroid No Surgery 2017: Only a Few Years Ago Surgery was the Only Treatment for Thyroid Cancer Treatment. Not Anymore

Thyroid No Surgery 2017: Only a Few Years Ago Surgery was the Only Treatment for Thyroid Cancer Treatment. Not Anymore

Thyroid No Surgery 2017: Only a Few Years Ago Surgery was the Only Treatment for Thyroid Cancer Treatment. Not Anymore
Thyroid No Surgery 2017: Only a Few Years Ago Surgery was the Only Treatment for Thyroid Cancer Treatment. Not Anymore. Active Surveillance,Ethanol PEI and Radiofrequency ablation RFA are used to treat micropapillary cancers and recurrent nodal recurrences in the neck.
Comments: At the World Thyroid Cancer Congress Dr.Hay presented data on primary small micropapillary cancer patients who refused surgery or Active surveillance and had their tumors ablated with ethanol. The Koreans have shown similar good results using RFA. These are a “third arm” for treatment of these small harmless tumors according to Dr.Hay. Santa Monica Thyroid center offers the third arm method with the use of ethanol ablation PEI and soon RFA for treatment.
Also tired of having another neck surgery for recurrent cancer lymph nodes? PEI is now available at my center and at the Mayo Clinic where the original studies show how each PEI saved a surgery with it’s  pain and suffering and cost.
Call Matt at 310-393-8860 for details thyroid.manager@protonmail.com
Richard Guttler MD,FACE,ECNU
thyroid.com

Low risk papillary thyroid cancer.

Brito JP1, Hay ID2, Morris JC.BMJ. 2014 Jun 16;348:g3045.
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Ian Hay MD of Mayo clinic,  Leading advocate for less surgery and more use of alternative treatment plans.

Thyroid cancer is one of the fastest growing diagnoses; more cases of thyroid cancer are found every year than all leukemias and cancers of the liver, pancreas, and stomach. Most of these incident cases are papillary in origin and are both small and localized. Patients with these small localized papillary thyroid cancers have a 99% survival rate at 20 years. In view of the excellent prognosis of these tumors, they have been denoted as low risk. The incidence of these low risk thyroid cancers is growing, probably because of the use of imaging technologies capable of exposing a large reservoir of subclinical disease. Despite their excellent prognosis, these subclinical low risk cancers are often treated aggressively. Although surgery is traditionally viewed as the cornerstone treatment for these tumors, there is less agreement about the extent of surgery (lobectomy v near total thyroidectomy) and whether prophylactic central neck dissection for removal of lymph nodes is needed. Many of these tumors are treated with radioactive iodine ablation and thyrotropin suppressive therapy, which-although effective for more aggressive forms of thyroid cancer-have not been shown to be of benefit in the management of these lesions. This review offers an evidence based approach to managing low risk papillary thyroid cancer. It also looks at the future of promising alternative surgical techniques, non-surgical minimally localized invasive therapies (ethanol ablation and radiofrequency ablation), and active surveillance, all of which form part of a more individualized treatment approach for low risk papillary thyroid tumors.

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