Thyroglassal Duct No Surgery 101: No Scar, No Morbidity, No Surgery, and Replaced by Outpatient Ethanol Ablation.

Thyroglassal Duct No Surgery 101: No Scar, No Morbidity, No Surgery, and Replaced by Outpatient Ethanol Ablation.

Thyroglassal Duct No Surgery 101: No Scar, No Morbidity, No Surgery, and Replaced by Outpatient Ethanol Ablation.

Thyroglassal Duct No Surgery 101: No Scar, No Morbidity, No Surgery, and Replaced by Outpatient Ethanol Ablation.

DR.Guttler’s Comments:

  1. Replace the Surgery for your TGD cyst with a simple outpatient procedure used ethanol to ablate the cyst in my office.
  2. Pre-treatment FNA biopsy to confirm there is no papillary cancer in the cyst wall.
  3. Detailed Neck ultrasound including the thyroid.
  4. If you are a candidate a short 30 minute procedure to remove cyst fluid and inject ethanol. After removal of the ethanol the patient can return to work the same day!
  5.  Except for slight pain during procedure there is usually no complications.
  6. Some need several treatments.
  7. Volume reduction > 50% in 80%.
  8. Relief of symptoms and cosmetic effect in all 11 cases in this study.
  9. Failure if it occurs can be followed use of radiofrequency ablation RFA or surgery.
  10. Do not believe physician that say ethanol is dangerous and painful. It is not dangerous, and only causes slight pain.
  11. Call me for an evaluation to see if you can save yourself from the old Sistrunk Surgery recommended by your ENT surgeon.
  12. images
  13. Scar from Sistrunk surgery for TGD cyst.
  14. 310393-8860 or thyroid.manager@protonmail.com.
  15. Dr.G.

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Patient before Ethanol Ablation with a TG duct cyst.

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Ultrasound of TGD cyst

Efficacy and Safety of Ethanol Ablation for Thyroglossal Duct Cysts

S.M. Kim, J.H. Baek, Y.S. Kim, J.Y. Sung, H.K. Lim, H. Choi and J.H. Lee

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: TGDC is a common congenital neck lesion, which has been treated by surgery. Although surgery is curative, it has drawbacks such as scars and surgical morbidity. Therefore, we applied EA as an alternative treatment technique. The purpose of this study was the evaluation of the efficacy and safety of EA for TGDC.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: Between May 2005 and July 2008, we performed EA in 11 patients with TGDC who refused surgery. All patients were confirmed as having benign lesions before treatment. US-guided aspiration of the cystic fluid was followed by injection of absolute ethanol (99%). The injected volume of ethanol was 50%–80% of the volume of fluid aspirated. We evaluated the therapeutic outcome, including volume reduction of the TGDC, improvement of cosmetic problems and symptoms, and complications.

RESULTS: The initial volume of the cysts ranged from 0.67 to 29.39 mL (mean, 6.0 mL). The procedure was performed in 1–3 sessions (mean, 1.4 sessions). Follow-up US was performed in 10 patients from 3 to 29 months (mean, 13.6 months). The mean volume of the cyst was 6.0 ± 8.4 mL, and volume reduction was 43.9%–100% (mean, 81.3%, P = .005) at last follow-up. Therapeutic success (volume reduction of >50%) was observed in 8 patients (8/10, 80%). Significant improvement of symptom- (P = .005) and cosmetic-grading scores (P = .003) was observed at last follow-up. No significant complications were observed during the procedure or follow-up periods.

CONCLUSIONS: EA seems to be an effective and safe treatment method for TGDC.

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