Thyroid Cancer 101: Why it is better to ablate the micro-papilliary thyroid cancer than watch it for years or have surgery.

Thyroid Cancer 101: Why it is better to ablate the micro-papilliary thyroid cancer than watch it for years or have surgery.

Thyroid Cancer 101: Why it is better to ablate the micro-papilliary thyroid cancer than watch it for years or have surgery.

Thyroid Cancer 101: Why it is better to ablate the micro-papillary thyroid cancer than watch it for years or have surgery.

Dr.Guttler’s Comments: Prevent years of worry about your thyroid micro cancer left in for long term with Active Surveillance follow up by ablating it with RFA. Post RFA biopsies of the area can confirm it is ablated. Now stop worry problem with RFA.

The results of this study have implications for both patients and physicians. Even though the mortality from well-differentiated thyroid cancer is low, worry is prevalent and varies by age, sex, level of education, race/ethnicity, and disease severity. This worry suggests a disconnect between actual thyroid cancer risks and patient perceptions of risk. Additionally, it is important to consider the potential impact of fear of recurrence and death on thyroid cancer survivors’ long-term surveillance. Prior work has shown increased use of post-treatment imaging surveillance in thyroid cancer patients (34,35), and it is possible that patient worry may be driving this phenomenon.

 

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Guatemalan Worry dolls

Worry in Thyroid Cancer Survivors with a Favorable Prognosis

Background: Little is known about cancer-related worry in thyroid cancer survivors with favorable prognosis.

Methods: A diverse cohort of patients diagnosed with differentiated thyroid cancer in 2014–2015 from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program registries of Georgia and Los Angeles County were surveyed two to four years after diagnosis. Main outcomes were any versus no worry about harms from treatments, quality of life, family at risk for thyroid cancer, recurrence, and death. After excluding patients with recurrent, persistent, and distant disease, multivariable logistic regression was used to identify correlates of worry in 2215 disease-free survivors.

Results: Overall, 41.0% reported worry about death, 43.5% worry about harms from treatments, 54.7% worry about impaired quality of life, 58.0% worry about family at risk, and 63.2% worry about recurrence. After controlling for disease severity, in multivariable analyses with separate models for each outcome, there was more worry in patients with lower education (e.g., worry about recurrence, high school diploma and below: odds ratio [OR] 1.78, 95% confidence interval [CI 1.36–2.33] compared with college degree and above). Older age and male sex were associated with less worry (e.g., worry about recurrence, age ≥65 years: OR 0.28 [CI 0.21–0.39] compared with age ≤44 years). Worry was associated with being Hispanic or Asian (e.g., worry about death, Hispanic: OR 1.41 [CI 1.09–1.83]; Asian: OR 1.57 [CI 1.13–2.17] compared with whites).

Conclusions: Physicians should be aware that worry is a major issue for thyroid cancer survivors with favorable prognosis. Efforts should be undertaken to alleviate worry, especially among vulnerable groups, including female patients, younger patients, those with lower education, and racial/ethnic minorities.

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